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Buying & Selling a Vehicle in Australia PDF Printable Version E-mail

 

BUYING & SELLING A VEHICLE IN AUSTRALIA

Rebecca Watts

Rebecca provides these useful notes of guidance to buying and selling a vehicle, including a motorhome or campervan, in Australia. Every state is different and here Rebecca focuses on the eastern states of Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria.

The main point is that each state and territory has different registration requirements and fees and that it is easiest to buy and sell a vehicle in the same state where it is registered. Each state also has its own terminology just to make things a bit more confusing. If selling in a different state to the registration state of the vehicle, it may be best to re-register in the state of sale, remembering that a new 'Roadworthiness Certificate' (RWC) and other documents will be required in order to re-register in another state. It might also be possible to sell to someone who plans to sell later in the state in which the vehicle is registered.

Private sale will always get the best price, but for a quick sale and to bypass the need to get an RWC etc, a dealer is the way to go.

Very useful information can be obtained from the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) for the state concerned.

Details are given below for east coast states (Queensland and NSW) and these should give a good idea of prices etc. Proof of acquisition of vehicle is required in all states to transfer ownership, e.g. receipt for purchase of the vehicle or the certificate of registration for the vehicle ('Rego'), completed and signed on the back by the previous registered owner.

It is always worth checking the identity of the seller to make sure that they are the registered owner.

A Gas Certificate is required from an authorised gas installer if gas appliances are installed this is for sure in Queensland and NSW, and in other states it may be required. Although not expensive, you need to check the vehicle has one before buying and you need to supply one upon sale.

If buying privately, it is worth getting what is called a REVS check - it checks if there is any money owing on the vehicle or if the vehicle is stolen etc. It costs $A10 for the check which is to be done on day of purchase, and certainly before handing over the readies.

In NSW: online.revs.nsw.gov.au/revs/public.htm.

In Queensland: www.consumer.qld.gov.au.

Stamp duty has to be paid it can be by either buyer or seller, but generally buyer pays. The seller is responsible for getting RWC/safety certificate.

If the vehicle is registered, the compulsory third party insurance will be transferred along with the registration. For example, if 3 months Rego remain on vehicle, the owner should also have paid up 3 months insurance.

Basically when buying, make sure you check:

the seller and the name on the registration relate to each other

the identification numbers on the vehicle, and those listed on the registration papers, match

any necessary safety check forms have been provided (such as a pink slip or safety certificate or RWC depending on state)

a REVS check has been satisfactorily completed

a vehicle inspection has been satisfactorily completed.

ask the seller to complete and sign the back of the certificate of registration. If the vehicle is registered in 2 names, both people must sign.

ask the seller to give you a receipt that shows:

- your name

- the date you bought the car

- the amount you paid for it

- the vehicle's VIN or chassis number, and engine number

- the seller's driver's licence, name and signature.

check that the seller's signature on the receipt matches the signature on the seller's licence.

ask the seller for a pink slip or safety certificate or RWC depending on state.

Transferring registration:

To transfer the registration of a vehicle, you must visit a motor registry and provide the following:

the certificate of registration for your vehicle, completed and signed on the back by the seller

proof of your identity, e.g. your driver's licence

the receipt showing that you are the new owner

the transfer fee and stamp duty cost.

Lists above taken from:

NSW: www.fairtrading.nsw.gov.au/pdfs/corporate/publications/ft224.pdf

Queensland: www.transport.qld.gov.au      consumer.qld.gov.au

Registration fees for QUEENSLAND

4 cylinder vehicle - 6 months $A119.40, 12 months $A225.40

5 or 6 cylinder vehicle - 6 months $A169.70, 12 months $A325.95

Compulsory third party insurance (CTP) required approx $A350 for 12 months

Transfer fee $A16

Stamp Duty on transfer - $A2 per $A100 of market value

When buying, check that the vehicle has a current safety certificate

When selling, you will need to get a safety certificate from authorised garage, cost will depend on repairs required. Checks basics like tyres, brakes, steering, suspension, body rust or damage, windscreen, lights. There is a fine of $A375 for selling a vehicle without a safety certificate. Selling in Queensland, only a Safety Certificate issued in Queensland is acceptable

Registration fees for NSW: www.rta.nsw.gov.au

www.fairtrading.nsw.gov.au/motorvehicles/buyingacar.html

Registration fees:

Vehicle up to 975kg - 12 months $A196

976kg to 1154 kg - 12 months $A215

1155kg to 1504kg - 12 months $A242

Green slip for compulsory third party insurance required - price based on age of driver and type of car - approx $A300 - 350

Not sure on transfer fee

Stamp Duty on transfer - $A3 per $A100 of market value

When buying, you need to check that the vehicle has a current pink slip which is a safety inspection report, issued by an AIS and which proves the vehicle has passed the required roadworthiness standards.

When selling, you will need to get a pink slip - cost will depend on repairs required or you can sell with a white slip - which just details what repairs are required to get a pink slip (in this case, the sale price will be lower).

Only a pink slip issued in NSW is acceptable.

Registration fees for VICTORIA: www.vicroads.vic.gov.au

Registration fees: 12 months $A157

Transport Accident Charge (TAC) (compulsory third party insurance) required - price based on age of driver and type of car - approx $A300 - 350

Transfer fee $A27.50

Stamp Duty on transfer - $A8 per $A200 of market value

When buying, check that the vehicle has current Roadworthy Certificate (RWC)

When selling, you will need to get a Roadworthy Certificate

Only an RWC issued in Victoria is acceptable.

Motoring Organisations:

There is no national body, each state has its own.

Queensland

www.racq.com.au Basic membership from $A54 p.a. $A33 joining fee

NSW

www.mynrma.com.au Basic membership from $A67.50 p.a. $A44 joining fee

Victoria

www.racv.com.au Basic membership from $A64 p.a. $A37 joining fee

Clubs

Campervan & Motorhome Club of Australia: www.cmca.net.au. To get advice and access to their magazine (where there are up to 300 campervans and motorhomes for sale, you can join as a non-Australian and non-campervan or Motorhome owner.

Big 4 caravan parks: www.big4.com.au

$A30 for a 2 year membership - 10% discount at all BIG 4 Parks

Comprehensive Insurance:

I don't know of any companies offering comprehensive insurance policies to overseas visitors, but if anybody does come across one please let us know and we can list them here.